Monday, 22 January 2018

Skin Care in Winter

Winter marks plummeting temperatures and cold winds. It is the time of the year to nestle into cozy pullovers, cardigans and scarves. Hot showers and comfort foods are the flavor of the season. However, your skin may take a severe beating in the harsh weather, becoming cracked and flaky.

To add to the woes, indoor thermostats dry up further your skin. Is there at least a possibility to have soft skin and maintain that glow in winter? Surely ‘yes’, if you are going to take good care of it. Battle on with the dry winter air, taking special care of your skin. The following are some great ideas for you in this direction.

Image courtesy: https://pixabay.com/en/woman-snow-winter-portrait-578428/


Indulge in a facial

Though there is no sun, the UV rays can still harm your skin. Treat your skin to a perfect facial in winter to show off that distinctive radiance. It boosts circulation and restores hydration. Apart from deep cleansing, it helps unblock pores and promotes healing.


Moisturize and exfoliate

A good moisturizer is the redeeming feature of winter skin care. Make sure you pick the right one for your skin type. Applying a moisturizer is essential to block evaporation of moisture from your skin, in addition to drawing more hydration into your skin.

Skin cells tend to turn over more slowly in winter. Exfoliation is the key to give you an instantly clear and glowing complexion, evening out pigments and discoloration. However, it is best not to exfoliate more than twice a week.

Look for gentle exfoliants with not-so-very-hard beads. A light glycolic peel is recommended for rejuvenation. If you are acne prone, choose a salicylic peel.

Switch to a right cleanser

In order to preserve the natural oils in your skin, look for glycerin-rich formulations that are not transparent. Wash your face with tepid water and pat dry with a soft, white towel.

Stay hydrated

You can stay hydrated and that is the simplest luxury you can let your skin can have.  Without adequate hydration, wrinkles and pores may appear pronounced, as the skin is made up of 64 % water.

Just piling on creams and oils is not definitely going to work up the shine in your skin. Make sure that you drink the recommended two liters of water a day to keep your skin plump and radiant. Adequate hydration also helps to renew skin and keep it soft and supple. 

Use sunscreen

It is an absolute no-no, if you think that sunscreen is only for summers. Winter sun can still damage your skin. Slather a sunscreen of at least SPF 30 on to your face and hands, about 30 minutes before you step out. You may have to reapply every two hours, if you are going to spend more time outdoors. 

Do you snuggle up indoors all day? The risk lurks even indoors in lower doses of ambient and infrared light from computers and overhead lamps. Wear a sunscreen to protect your skin from the lights in your home, laptop and phone screens.

Try DIY facemasks

Facemasks are a great means to keep your skin hydrated and nourished. Have fun making them at home. Just picking the ingredients from your kitchen cupboard and cutting down costs is one thing, while its brighter side is you guard your skin from harmful chemical additives found in store-brought products.

Here comes a bit of inspiration to get you started. You may use the ingredients alone or as combo masks; mix them into a thick paste or cream, apply on to your face and leave it on for 20-30 minutes. Wash with warm water and pat dry. Say goodbye to chapped winter skin!

        1.      Mix one ripe banana with ½ cup yoghurt and 1 tsp almond oil. It makes a great all-purpose moisturizer.


        2.      Blend ½ ripe avocado with 1 egg white, 1 tsp yoghurt and finish off with 1 tbsp olive oil for an all-natural nourishing cream.


      3.    Is yours a sensitive skin? Combine ½ cup oatmeal, ¼ cup milk and 1 tsp honey to seal in moisture. Honey heals too.


If finding satisfying solutions to your skin problems is difficult, do not think twice about seeking expert guidance from a qualified aesthetic medical practitioner.

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